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Saturday, May 22, 2004

Del Rio News-Herald

Del Rio News-Herald



Contact our news staff at (830) 775-1551.

Immigrant's death under investigation

By Karen Gleason
The News-Herald

Published May 23, 2004

An autopsy has been requested to determine what caused the death of a young man whose body was found Friday on a ranch northwest of the Del Rio city limits.

The body was located on the Nixon Ranch northwest of Del Rio Friday afternoon by U.S. Border Patrol agents who had been alerted to its presence by authorities in Ciudad Acu–a, Coah., Mexico, according to Lt. Larry Pope, who heads the Val Verde County Sheriff's Office criminal investigations division.

Pope said he was told that the man, believed to be in his early 20s and a resident of the Mexico state of Oaxaca, was an undocumented immigrant who illegally crossed the Rio Grande with two traveling companions, a man and a woman. Pope said the woman identified herself to authorities as the dead man's common-law wife. Pope said the woman told immigration authorities in Mexico that she and the other man turned around and went back to Ciudad Acu–a after her common-law husband died.

After the pair alerted authorities in Mexico, those authorities called the Mexican Consulate in Del Rio, which in turn notified the U.S. Border Patrol here. The man and woman then were escorted back to the United States to assist Border Patrol agents in locating the body.

"After the witnesses to the death were returned to Mexico, the Border Patrol notified the Val Verde Sheriff's Office," Pope said Saturday.

Pope said all of the information he had received about the case is as yet unsubstantiated by witness interviews. Pope also said all of the identification the dead man carried was removed by the man and woman who were with him when he died, and that they took that identification back to Mexico with them.

Pope said the man was pronounced dead by Justice of the Peace Precinct 2 Joey Gonzalez, who ordered the autopsy.

Tyson's Fires Illegal Aliens

And....this includes everyone who hires an illegal alien nanny, housekeeper, gardner, etc. They are equally guilty of violating federal immigration law (Employer Sanctions) and should also be prosecuted.
Rest assured that YOU as an individual patriot can be incredibly effective!
ACTION I: CCIR offers a simple adhesive label that many have used most effectively. It states, "EMPLOYING ILLEGAL ALIENS IS A VIOLATION OF FEDERAL LAW - EMPLOYER SANCTIONS (Sec. 274A [8 U.S.C. 1324a]a).
When we see gardeners, construction workers, roofers, housekeepers, nannies, etc. in our neighborhoods who cannot speak or understand English, we simply put one of these labels on the homeowner's front door.
Guess what? The majority of the time, we do NOT see these workers again.
ACTION II: When contacting companies for work needed in your home or on your property, ask the employer if they hire illegal aliens. The answer will be NO. Say, fine but you will ask to see ALL the employees' "papers" before they start work. ONLY those who employ citizens or legit immigrants will even continue the conversation.
ACTION III: Advise those who knock on your door asking for work that you want to see their "papers" before you agree. Watch most of them "disappear"!
ACTION IV: Go to the day-labor centers and concentrate on pics of LICENSE PLATES of those who are hiring and, if possible, a pic of the vehicle driver. Watch these scumbags split - - 0 to 60mph in seconds!



------- Forwarded message follows -------
From: "laura"
To: "Laura L. Leighton"
Subject: Fw: INS{VA} Tyson Foods fires 42 undocumented workers
Date sent: Thu, 20 May 2004 22:29:41 -0700




It's possible Tyson, apart from having the last lawsuit found out about illegals' lawsuit against Wal-Mart under the pretext of being "independent contractors".

----- Original Message ----- From: W.G.E.N.
To: idzrus@earthlink.net
Sent: Thursday, May 20, 2004 12:59 PM
Subject: INS{VA} Tyson Foods fires 42 undocumented workers



Every employer in America should be held accountable for KNOWINGLY hiring ILLEGAL INVADERS.
We all know that false documents can be hard to detect with the technology of producing false documents but there are ways to verify some of that information if an employer is dedicated to hiring only LEGAL Americans. Perhaps a notice on the job application form that hiring will only take place AFTER verification is received from the INS or SSA of the documents provided in the application. Another requirement would be that the applicant must speak ENGLISH! If the applicant is even a tad bit suspicious - ask for citizenship papers. There is NOTHING WRONG with protecting yourself from the crime of hiring an ILLEGAL. It may take a bit more time but when the stake of America is at risk here - it should be worth it to every employer. Put some responsibility on the people in Human Resources to make sure those hired are LEGAL. I have worked in those departments and verifying info on the I-9 forms isn't all that hard to do if you are sincere in hiring only LEGAL citizens.

Now for the street corner hiring halls - get out there with cameras - take lots of pictures - get faces - get license plates with faces so no one can deny they are the guilty critters helping to destroy America for a few pieces of silver (profit). This is war, folks, and the future of America is at stake here - don't forget it.
When you get those pictures make lots of copies and send them off to all your local media with the info of when, where, why and ask them to publish those pics for all to see. Soon, the ILLEGALS and the crooked employers will figure out they have to move on - follow them if you can and repeat this operation. Put heat on the property owners who allow this too.

Keep in mind the uproar those pictures coming out of Iraq have caused. PICTURES WORK!
People who can't read understand pictures.

Jackie Juntti
WGEN idzrus@earthlink.net


http://www.fredericksburg.com/News/apmethods/apstory?urlfeed=D82LRUG00.xml


Tyson Foods fires 42 undocumented workers

The Associated Press
HARRISONBURG, Va.

Tyson Foods Inc. has fired 8 percent of its workforce at its Harrisonburg plant, all immigrant workers who could not verify their employment documents, company officials said.

The company earlier this month suspended 63 workers and gave them until last Friday to prove their legal status in the U.S., or face permanent dismissal.

By Monday, 42 workers were fired for submitting falsified employment documents, said company spokeswoman Libby Lawson. She said the rest were found to have proper paperwork and were allowed to return. Two, however, decided to quit and find other employment, she said.

"We were very disappointed," Lawson said.

Tyson Foods discovered problems with the employees' work documents during a routine audit about three weeks ago. The 42 fired workers had used Social Security numbers that had originated in Puerto Rico, Lawson said. All 63 questioned have Latino surnames, but their nationalities were not known.

Lawson said once the company's investigation is complete, the company would forward its report to the Bureau of Immigration and Customs Enforcement.

The Tyson corporate office conducts audits of its hiring process at least once a year, selecting the location at random. Lawson said it would be a daunting task for the Springdale, Ark., company to perform an audit for all of its 120,000 employees.

The Harrisonburg plant employs 550 workers and processes 660,000 chickens a week for the fast-food and deli markets. Lawson said the firings were necessary to abide by the law, and will be costly for the company and local economy.

However, immigration problems are nothing new for the chicken giant.

An audit in March found 450 undocumented workers at a Tyson meatpacking plant in Dakota City, Neb., of which at least 250 were fired.

Last year, Tyson Foods and five of its managers were acquitted of charges linking them to an immigrant-smuggling scheme. One manager pleaded guilty to related charges in 2002.

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Great News resources:

Team America http://www.teamamericapac.org/
Glenn Spencer's American Border Patrol http://www.americanpatrol.com/
The American Resistance http://www.theamericanresistance.com/
Lewis News http://www.lewisnews.com/main.asp back on-line again!
News With Views http://www.newswithviews.com/
Covenant News http://www.covenantnews.com/blog/
Sierra Times http://www.sierratimes.com/
Idaho Observer http://www.proliberty.com/observer/
Sonoran News http://www.sonorannews.com/
The Citizens Review On-Line http://www.citizenreviewonline.org/current_news.html
Buy AMERICAN - http://www.buyamerican.com/
** Judicial Forum http://www.judicialforum.org/
How To Buy American |||||| http://www.howtobuyamerican.com/


"Federal Funds" - "Matching Funds" - "State Funds" these are all fraudulent terms as government in America has no funds of any kind except those funds it first takes from the private citizen, you and me. All these so-called "funds" are those monies government has creamed from excessive taxes (handling fees) which they then turn around and *gift* us with (including ropes with a hangman's noose) to coerce another level of government to hang us with. All that *sugar* they dangle in front of the eyes of the greedy tax hogs is filled with poison but it isn't tasted until it is too late. A spoonful of sugar helps the poison go down.

We would all be much better off if we would handle all projects at the local level and didn't swallow all that *sugar*. Stop sending your resources to Washington DC for them to siphon off those "handling/laundering fees" before 'gifting us' with those phoney 'matching funds'

It is these same siphoned off funds they are handing over to ILLEGAL INVADERS, assisting in the overthrow of America.



------- End of forwarded message -------
--
Barbara Coe
Chairman
California Coalition for Immigration Reform
http://www.ccir.net

One Reporter's Opinion: 'Illegal' Health Risk

One Reporter's Opinion: 'Illegal' Health Risk

One Reporter's Opinion: 'Illegal' Health Risk
George Putnam
Saturday, May 22, 2004
It is this reporter's opinion that the Congress of the United States acted tragically against America's best interests when it shot down Dana Rohrabacher's illegal alien medical bill, HR 3722. Powerful interests representing hospitals, pharmaceuticals, etc., acted against us.

All the bill asked was that illegal aliens - violators of our sovereignty - be identified as illegal!


But this is a sad, continuing story and particularly in those states that border on Mexico, where we witness a steady, silent, pervasive invasion of the U.S. by an unarmed army carrying an assembly line of diseases into the heart of America.

And it grows unabated as an average of 2,000 illegals cross over U.S. borders without being screened for diseases.


It is a silent invasion with deadly consequences to America and our children!


Recently I read a brilliant dissertation, "IMMIGRATION'S SILENT INVASION, DEADLY CONSEQUENCES." It was researched by Stephany Gabbard, a registered nurse, and Frosty Wooldridge, former U.S. Army Medical Service Corps officer, teacher and author.

They offer a frightening study of how the hordes of illegals invading our nation have reintroduced tuberculosis, leprosy, smallpox and Chagas' disease. (Chagas is a nasty parasitic bug common in Latin America, where 18 million people are infected and 50,000 die annually.)


The most serious is a MDR (multi-drug-resistant) tuberculosis, with a higher death rate than cancer. The deadly bacteria becomes airborne when an afflicted person coughs.

It is estimated that each victim infects 10, 20 or more people with a time-bomb lasting effect.

To make matters worse, in excess of 7,000 new cases of leprosy have been diagnosed in the U.S. in the past three years. Chagas, called the "kissing bug disease" because the parasite favors the face as a root of infection, damages the heart and intestines and even threatens our blood supply; hundreds of blood recipients may be silently infected. And there is dengue fever, polio, cases of malaria ... and God only knows what other diseases.


The health-care crisis spreads daily across our nation and is not confined to the border states. The Queens, N.Y., Health Department found 81 percent of new tuberculosis cases among illegals and foreign-born people, who have an eight times higher incidence of TB. In fact, two-thirds of the cases of TB brought into the U.S. originated in three countries: Mexico, the Philippines and Vietnam.


Take the case of Miguel, who worked in construction on a subway renovation and was able to change his status to "legal permanent alien." Miguel is infected with tuberculosis. But this did not stop the federal government from issuing Miguel a health waiver under the Immigration and Nationality Act. That permits him to have a green card, though his disease made him inadmissible for the waiver. Miguel continues to move about at will, spreading TB wherever he goes.


Or take the case of a young worker in Santa Barbara, Calif., who refused to take his medication and has spread 56 known cases of TB to fellow workers.


Illegal aliens continue pouring over the borders, their bodies carrying hepatitis A, B and C, tuberculosis, leprosy, Chagas' disease, smallpox and more. Yet the Congress of the United States will not act effectively to secure our borders.

It's time to stop illegal immigration by whatever means necessary - U.S. troops, National Guardsmen, mass deportations and the arrest of employers who hire illegal aliens. I say hit 'em where it hurts the most: Remove their source of profit! And make the punishment fit the crime.



Related Links:
http://www.michnews.com/artman/publish/article_2051.shtml


The legendary George Putnam is 89 years young and a veteran of 69 years as a reporter, broadcaster and commentator ... and is still going strong on KSPA-AM, 12 noon to 2 p.m. Pacific Time - simulcast all over the world on the CRN Radio Network.

Arrests Made in Meth Distribution Ring

Carthage Press: News Index

Arrests made in meth distribution ring

By Dennis W. Sowers, Of The Press Staff
A three-month drug conspiracy investigation resulted in the arrests of six people by the Jasper County Drug Task Force last week on federal grand jury indictments.

The task force, along with the help of the Carthage Police Department, Joplin Police Department, Southwest Drug Task Force and the Jasper, Newton and Barton County sheriff's departments, arrested three people at the Motel 6 in Joplin and three were arrested who were already in custody.

The investigation focused on the distribution of methamphetamine in the Jasper County area. During the course of the investigation approximately $110,000 in cash and 14 firearms were seized. A portion of the cash will return to the JCDTF to be used in future investigations.

Mark Walker, 43, a former Carthage resident with a current address of 6374 Hwy. 43, Joplin, was arrested on two counts of possession of a controlled substance with intent to distribute. Melanie Fortner, 38, a former Carthage resident with a current address of 6374 Hwy. 43, Joplin, was arrested on two counts of possession with intent to distribute. Juan H. Gonzalez, also a former Carthage resident who is presently residing at the Motel 6, was arrested on one count of possession with intent to distribute. All three were arrested without incident.

"All these people kind of showed up all at once," said Det. Randee Kaiser of the Jasper Country Drug Task Force. "We kind of fell into things and we figured out what the connection was.

"We got them pretty much in the initial stages, which is a good thing."

Manuel Villareal, 46, Joplin, who was once a Carthage resident, was already in custody at the U.S. Marshall's Office in Springfield. He was arrested on two counts of possession of a controlled substance for sale, one count of illegal alien unlawfully in the U.S., one count of previously deported illegal alien returning to the U.S., one count of possession of a firearm in furtherance of a conspiracy and one count of conspiracy to distribute a controlled substance.

Brian Valentine, 34, Joplin, previously in custody at the Jasper County Sheriff's Department, was charged with three counts of possession of a controlled substance and one count of conspiracy to distribute a controlled substance.

Olegario Villareal, 24, Joplin, was arrested for one count of possession with intent to distribute a controlled substance. He was already in custody at the Newton County Sheriff's Department.

All six of the suspects were were indicted by a grand jury in Springfield. Count one alleges that all defendants conspired to distribute 500 grams or more of methamphetamine between February and May 6. Count nine would require Villareal-Amarillas to forfeit any proceeds, including $78,870 seized from him on March 17.

Motels became the focus of the investigation as the suspects use them as vehicles to distribute drugs.

"It offers a little anonymity -- being in a motel as opposed to a permanent residence," Kaiser said. "For someone on the move, it's easier to go that route. They can pack up and move to another motel to avoid detection by police very easily.

"Several of the group, their only residence was motels. They had been living in motels the last several months."

Kaiser said it was the combined cooperation of several hotels and motels that helped lead to the arrests.

The former Carthage patrolman also said the whole project would not have been possible without the help of cooperating agencies who did reports and surveillance and served search warrants. He said the task force looks good in making the arrests but that "without their help we just wouldn't have been able to get it done."

Kaiser said that the federal indictments were an indication of the seriousness of the crime but not a signal that the task force's work was done.

"Each time you've taken a gram off the street you've made a dent," Kaiser said. "If that puts you one step closer to solving the problem, I don't know. I don't know if you ever go down that road."

Progress in RICO

May 20, 2004


--Similar aims in Rohrabacher bill and FILE's LA County suit
--Howard Foster's work on RICO proceeding well


Similar aims in Rohrabacher bill, FILE's LA County suit

Tuesday, Congress failed to pass a bill (H.R. 3722) introduced by Rep. Dana Rohrabacher of California that would have required hospitals to request citizenship, immigration status, and other information from aliens in order to receive funds under the "Undocumented Alien Emergency Medical Assistance" portion of the Medicare Prescription Drug Act.

While the bill failed, Congressman Rohrabacher has done the country a service by bringing attention to the widespread disregard for laws limiting access to non emergency public health care by those illegally in the United States.

The FILE suit currently active in Los Angeles Superior Court would, if successful, compel the county to seek reimbursement from the sponsors of legal immigrants for those same services. Such a ruling, it is hoped, would accomplish by court order essentially what the Rohrabacher bill sought to do, i.e., require public service providers to collect data on all aliens, to keep records, and to make the information available to authorities.

There is a status conference on the FILE suit scheduled for June 8 in Los Angeles. FILE members interested in learning more about this important effort are urged to contact me.

H.R. 3722
http://fileus.com/dept/healthcare/index.html

Anderson v Los Angeles DHS
http://fileus.com/dept/healthcare/lacounty/index.html


Foster having success with RICO application to illegal hiring schemes

Member attorney Howard Foster, Johnson & Bell, Ltd., Chicago, IL, has provided copies of the favorable decisions in two of his recent cases litigating violations under RICO of the INA provisions making it illegal to hire illegal aliens.

Howard is the country's leading litigator in this promising area of the law, and his recent successes are encouraging.

When Congress expanded the Racketeer Influenced and Corrupt Organizations Act (RICO) in 1996 to include certain violations of federal immigration law (chief among them the law against hiring illegal aliens), it handed the American people a powerful law enforcement tool. [Under RICO, an American citizen or law abiding business owner who suffers damages due to the illegal hiring practices of an employer or competitor may bring suit. If found in violation, the employer or competitor is liable for triple damages, attorneys' fees, and costs.]

It was to safeguard this promising enforcement tool and efforts like Foster's that FILE filed the motion to intervene in the New Jersey case, Zavala v Wal-Mart, a case in which the plaintiffs are seeking damages under RICO. In Zavala, the plaintiffs are not the American citizens or law abiding competitors whose wages or profits may have been driven down by Wal-Mart's alleged illegal hiring scheme, the plaintiffs are the illegal aliens arrested in the Wal-Mart raids last year. FILE's motion asks the court to dismiss the plaintiff's RICO claims.

WILLIAMS ET AL. v MOHAWK INDUSTRIES
MENDOZA ET AL. v ZIRKLE FRUIT CO. ET AL.
http://fileus.com/dept/hiring/index.html

CIS Backgrounder (Micah King)
http://www.cis.org/articles/2003/back1103.html

_______________________________
Craig Nelsen
Friends of Immigration Law Enforcement
310 6th St. 2nd Flr.
Washington, DC 20003
202 543 2323

Immigrant Workers Targeted By New Scam

Immigrant Workers Targeted By New Scam

In a KXAN exclusive, News 36 looks at the investigation underway into a string of criminals who've come up with a surprising new way to rob you.

Arrest warrants show some Austin thieves are using prostitutes to lure victims in so they can attack and rob them.

There is a specific community here in Austin that's often the target of these robberies -- undocumented immigrants because they are less likely to tell police about it.

"Right now this is only a few cases," Director of Office of Immigrant Concerns Leo Anchondo said.

There are thousands of cases of immigrants who've been robbed in Austin.

"I would say one of every three clients that we see has been victimized in any way," Anchondo said.

Anchondo has never seen a case like this. According to arrest warrants, two immigrants claim they were robbed at gun point by two prostitutes and two men.

They say "the females had entered their apartment through their unlocked front door, uninvited and offered them sex." The men refused and told police within seconds two black men barged into the apartment with guns and robbed them of nearly $1,000.

"I was a little surprised by the level of creativity to attack this community," Anchondo said.

Anchondo says the immigrant community is often attacked, even street ice cream vendors.

"They just take their money and run," Anchondo said.

Nineteen-year-old Francisco Javier of Mexico says he knows of at least five different vendors who've been robbed.

"I think that it's bad that they're doing that. They should go and work instead of robbing," Javier said.

In this latest robbery, police have arrested and connected one of the prostitutes to other criminals who "are suspects in several other immigrant robberies. One is in jail for attempted capital murder for a separate case in which he robbed and shot a person after using a prostitute to lure that victim in."

"I think that now that we are aware of this new trend in crime we would make an effort to get it out to the community that we serve," Anchondo said.

Austin Police did not want to comment about the investigation and could not give us any mugshots of the suspects because they continue to look into the possibility of more victims of this latest scam.

Meanwhile the Office of Immigrant Concerns says you should be concern because crimes like this affect everyone.

AP Wire | 05/20/2004 | Miami immigration worker accused of taking bribes

AP Wire | 05/20/2004 | Miami immigration worker accused of taking bribes

Posted on Thu, May. 20, 2004





Miami immigration worker accused of taking bribes

Associated Press


MIAMI - A federal immigration worker provided forged documentation stamps and passports to ineligible illegal aliens in return for cash bribes, according to a grand jury indictment released Thursday.

Gudiela Sibori, an employee of the U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services, accepted $7,900 for seven forged Alien Documentation Identification Telecommunication stamps purchased by a government informant, the indictment said.

The stamps are placed on an immigrant's passport when they arrive in the United States and are temporary proof of lawful permanent residence. The stamps allow its bearer to get a driver's license and Social Security card.

Sibori also is accused of providing altered, forged passports that contained the stamps to illegal aliens who were ineligible to receive them, an affidavit filed May 7 said.

She was in custody on Thursday, but it was not known when she was arrested, if she had been issued bond or if she has a lawyer.

Sibori faces up to 15 years in prison if convicted of taking bribes in return for the stamps, and 20 years in prison if convicted of providing and misusing the passports.

Immigrant Sensitive GOPers Facing Tough Times from Conservatives

Caribbean News details

Immigrant Sensitive GOPers Facing Tough Times From Conservatives For Position

WASHINGTON, D.C., Fri. May 21: Republican congressmembers all around the country are having to answer tough questions when it comes to immigration and where they stand, as they battle primary election challengers in their home states.

In conservative states around the nation, liberal and immigrant sensitive Republican congressmembers are being chastised for supporting legalization of the undocumented, a Washington Times report recently discovered.

The support is being equated with support for amnesty for “illegals” and being used to shore up opposition against the incumbent representatives.
Rep. Christopher B. Cannon, a Utah Republican and a prominent legalization supporter is among those feeling the fall-out for his support of undocumented immigrants working in some agricultural areas to gain legal status.

Cannon recently failed to win the required 60 percent of the vote at a Republican nominating convention a little more than a week ago and now faces a primary in June against Matt Throckmorton, a former state legislator who is running hard on the immigration issue.

In Arizona, the less conservative GOPers, Rep. Jim Kolbe and Rep. Jeff Flake, are also facing the fire for their support of a broad guest-worker program that would allow a path to citizenship for most illegal aliens in the United States.

Kolbe is being challenged by state Rep. Randy Graf while Flake will face Stan Barnes.

All of the challengers say the support amounts to amnesty for illegal behavior. Groups like the controversial, ProjectUSA, which was based in New York and then fled to Utah, are fanning the flames, putting up billboards with stark messages such as "Congressman Chris Cannon wants amnesty for illegal aliens."

And the Coalition for the Future American Worker paid for radio spots to spur up anger against Cannon’s liberal support.

But Cannon, according to the Washington Times, is standing his ground, stating recently, "The more we talk to folks, the better it is, and they understand we're not talking about amnesty — we're not talking about bringing millions of folks into the U.S."

And all three argue there is a need to fill jobs and legalize those who are undocumented here in the interest of national security.

Now it’s left to be seen whether they will hold their ground and stay true to their principles when the election day comes around. – Hardbeatnews.com

Caribbean News details

Caribbean News details

Immigrant Sensitive GOPers Facing Tough Times From Conservatives For Position

WASHINGTON, D.C., Fri. May 21: Republican congressmembers all around the country are having to answer tough questions when it comes to immigration and where they stand, as they battle primary election challengers in their home states.

In conservative states around the nation, liberal and immigrant sensitive Republican congressmembers are being chastised for supporting legalization of the undocumented, a Washington Times report recently discovered.

The support is being equated with support for amnesty for “illegals” and being used to shore up opposition against the incumbent representatives.
Rep. Christopher B. Cannon, a Utah Republican and a prominent legalization supporter is among those feeling the fall-out for his support of undocumented immigrants working in some agricultural areas to gain legal status.

Cannon recently failed to win the required 60 percent of the vote at a Republican nominating convention a little more than a week ago and now faces a primary in June against Matt Throckmorton, a former state legislator who is running hard on the immigration issue.

In Arizona, the less conservative GOPers, Rep. Jim Kolbe and Rep. Jeff Flake, are also facing the fire for their support of a broad guest-worker program that would allow a path to citizenship for most illegal aliens in the United States.

Kolbe is being challenged by state Rep. Randy Graf while Flake will face Stan Barnes.

All of the challengers say the support amounts to amnesty for illegal behavior. Groups like the controversial, ProjectUSA, which was based in New York and then fled to Utah, are fanning the flames, putting up billboards with stark messages such as "Congressman Chris Cannon wants amnesty for illegal aliens."

And the Coalition for the Future American Worker paid for radio spots to spur up anger against Cannon’s liberal support.

But Cannon, according to the Washington Times, is standing his ground, stating recently, "The more we talk to folks, the better it is, and they understand we're not talking about amnesty — we're not talking about bringing millions of folks into the U.S."

And all three argue there is a need to fill jobs and legalize those who are undocumented here in the interest of national security.

Now it’s left to be seen whether they will hold their ground and stay true to their principles when the election day comes around. – Hardbeatnews.com

Hamlin - 2004, May 21 Annex Mexico?

Hamlin - 2004, May 21

May 21, 2004


Immigration and the Mexican Border
Sheryl Hamlin

Billions of dollars for fences and guards have not kept the masses from rushing across the US-Mexican border in search of a better life here in the U.S. The coyotes profit and the lucky ones arrive to a new life, while others die in flight -- all paid for by the U.S. taxpayer.

Here is another idea worth considering: Annex Mexico. Look at the history of the U.S. and Mexico. Attached once, a series of wars in the 1900’s drew modern day boundaries.

Mexico is predominantly a Christian nation governed by laws. Its language is in use by a large segment of the population of the United States. If we annexed Mexico, making it first a protectorate like Guam, with the intention of full statehood in the future, we could change the dynamics of the Northern Hemisphere.

Mexican citizens could pass freely between the countries. Criminals could be tried under U.S. law without deportation to Mexico. Workers without criminal records could work. Money would be taxed and collected by the U.S. Government to pay for their services. The U.S. could divert the border wars money into country building efforts.

The relationship between Mexican law and U.S.law would be that of a state and federal law. The current leaders would be equivalent to the leaders of California.

Does this sound far-fetched and impossible? Possibly the benefits to both countries would outweigh the momentary loss of power and sovereignty. This is a diplomatic effort worthy of consideration.

New York City - News, Entertainment and Sports

New York City - News, Entertainment and Sports

This story was reported by Sean Gardiner, Luis Perez, Deborah S. Morris and Pete Bowles. It was written by Bowles.

May 21, 2004, 12:04 AM EDT


One worker was killed and two others critically injured Thursday when the substandard balcony overhang on which they were working collapsed at an apartment complex under construction in Brooklyn, authorities said.

Officials said the men were standing on top of a third-story balcony overhang pouring buckets of cement when the overhang crumbled and collapsed onto the balcony below, dropping the men more than 30 feet to the ground. A fourth worker jumped off the overhang onto the building's roof and escaped injury.

The accident occurred shortly after 10 a.m. at a three-building complex at 9718 Fort Hamilton Pkwy. in Bay Ridge near the Verrazano-Narrows Bridge.

City Building Department officials cited the complex's owner and two subcontractors for violating two city regulations and ordered all work on the project to be stopped pending an investigation. Late Thursday, safety workers erected scaffolding and began removing the two damaged balconies and shoring up other balconies at the site.

A preliminary investigation by the Building Department found that the balconies had been erected contrary to approved plans for the three-story buildings, said Jennifer Givner, a department spokeswoman. She said the balconies were supposed to be recessed so that the building would act as a support; instead, they were erected with the use of outside support beams.

Givner said a steel beam supporting the balcony gave way, causing the balcony to pull away from the building and pancake onto a second-story balcony, which partially collapsed.

She said the building's owner, Marine Development, and two subcontractors, Big Apple Construction of Bayside and Pro Weld Fabricators, were issued violations for not following engineering plans approved by the city and for failing to have an updated work permit.

She said investigators found that the building permit for the complex, which has been under construction since 2001, expired in February. She said the firms face maximum fines of $2,500 each for working with an expired permit. Officials of the companies could not be reached for comment.

Killed in the crash of concrete and wooden scaffolding was Angelo Gungasaca, an Ecuadorian who lived in Queens. He was pronounced dead on arrival at Victory Memorial Hospital in Brooklyn.

The two other workers, Jose Fernandez, 21, of Corona and Gam Youl Bak, 41, also of Queens, were admitted to Lutheran Medical Center's trauma ward in critical condition. Fernandez suffered two broken legs and a neck injury, and Bak was unconscious, authorities said.

All three were employed by Big Apple Construction.

"I don't know what happened," Fernandez said from his hospital bed. "I only know that God has saved me."

Edgar Jaramillo, 25, said he managed to jump to safety onto the roof when he heard a noise. "I think, 'Balcony going down, I go up,'" he said, breaking into tears. "I tried to tell everybody but they didn't hear. So I just jumped."

Lenny Gungasaca, the brother of the dead worker, said Angelo Gungasaca had worked for Big Apple for three years and each week sent money to Ecuador to support his wife and two children. "I feel really bad because my brother died," he said through a translator. "I just cannot talk about it."

Brian McLaughlin, president of the city's Central Labor Council, said an investigation found that the victims were undocumented workers.

"Immigrant workers toil in some of the most hazardous employment in our country, while New York has the highest rate of immigrants killed on the job every year," McLaughlin said. "We all know these type of tragedies are completely preventable if employers would obey existing health and safety rules."

Neighbors questioned the quality of the work and said they suspected that undocumented immigrants were being used on the project.

"I feel bad for the workers," said Frances Loftus, who has lived in the neighborhood for 50 years. "I feel they are being exploited. They are hard-working people but they need more experience. They are being taken advantage of on safety issues. It's a shame."

THAILAND-U.S.: Freer Trade Weakens Access to HIV/AIDS Drugs

THAILAND-U.S.: Freer Trade Weakens Access to HIV/AIDS Drugs

Freer Trade Weakens Access to HIV/AIDS Drugs

Marwaan Macan-Markar


BANGKOK, May 21 (IPS) - Thailand's impressive achievement in caring for those with HIV is under threat if the government signs a free trade agreement (FTA) with the United States, activists say as Bangkok prepares to start discussions in June.

This fear stems from the likelihood that once the FTA is signed, Thailand will find it all but impossible to produce the cheap generic drugs that it offers thousands of people living with HIV.

''Thailand will not be able to produce new generic drugs to stall the spread of AIDS because of the tough conditions that the U.S. plans imposing in the FTA,'' said Jacques-chai Chomthongdi, researcher at Focus on the Global South, a Bangkok-based think tank.

Among these conditions are Washington's efforts to extend the number of years that a patent for a drug can be held by a pharmaceutical company before it can be produced as a generic one.

U.S. trade negotiators are enforcing a 25-year period for drug patents under the FTA, as opposed to the 20-year period under the current rules governing global trade.

In addition, Thailand's state-owned pharmaceutical company, the lead agency in producing a host of generic drugs, will be hampered from accessing basic data necessary to make the cheaper medicines.

''The U.S. wants test data to be kept a secret,'' Jacques-chai said in an interview. ''They are determined to protect the monopoly of their pharmaceutical companies.''

Critics of the FTA are also alarmed at the possible plans by the United States to change the rules by which those who violate intellectual property rights (IPR) are prosecuted - and make this a criminal rather than just a civil offence.

As worrying, say international humanitarian agencies, is the risk that an FTA with the United States could limit Thailand's sale of generic drugs to poverty-stricken countries like Cambodia, Laos and Burma to help those with HIV.

''With the FTA, Thailand will not be able to export generics to Cambodia, Burma and Laos,'' Paul Cawthorne of Medecins Sans Frontiers (MSF) told IPS. ''The U.S. has targeted medicine in the FTAs it has signed with Singapore and Latin American countries.''

Earlier in May, officials from the U.S. Chamber of Commerce revealed how serious the intellectual property issue was during a hearing on the planned Thai-U.S. FTA held in Washington by the U.S. International Trade Commission.

''(We) will not support the signing of the final agreement unless IPR were protected and that protection enforceable,'' Myron Brilliant of the chamber was quoted in the media as having told the trade commission.

Negotiators from Washington and Bangkok are due to start trade talks in June, with the aim of completing the free trade deal in 2005. That would make Thailand the second South-east Asian country after Singapore to have such a trade pact with the United States.

Currently, the United States tops the list of Thailand's trading partners, while Thailand ranks as the 18th largest trading partner of the United States. The value of their two-way trade exceeded 21 billion U.S. dollars in 2003, with the scales tipped in favour of Thailand.

U.S. companies have also invested extensively in Thailand. The Washington-based U.S.-Thailand FTA Business Coalition estimates such investments to be over 16 billion dollars.

Critics of the FTA say that Thailand will end up the worst off in this deal, offering as a case in point the U.S. government's cool attitude toward cheaper drugs for the sick and the dying among the world's poor.

''Thailand appears ready to give up on the IPR issues and give what the U.S. wants in order to gain access to U.S. markets for its agriculture exports and products from its industrial sector,'' said Jacques-chai of Focus of the Global South.

Humanitarian agencies like MSF back their concerns by pointing to the cold reception Washington has given the recent achievements that enable developing countries to access low-cost medicines.

Shortly before the fifth ministerial conference of the World Trade Organisation (WTO) held in September in Cancun, Mexico, member governments struck an agreement in favour of the world's poor. Under that deal, developing countries were given the right to import generic medicines to cope with public health emergencies, such as HIV/AIDS.

That followed another a groundbreaking achievement at the WTO meeting in Doha in 2001. At that ministerial meeting, governments - including the United States - agreed that the Trade-Related Aspects of Intellectual Property Rights (TRIPS) will not be a hurdle for those afflicted with pandemics to gain access to cheaper drugs.

This optional clause under TRIPS, which protects patents, meant that developing countries could either import generic drugs or issue compulsory licences for the production of generic drugs still protected by patents.

Thailand, along with Brazil and India, were held up as the sources of hope in the wake of those agreements given their record of producing generic drugs.

The state-run pharmaceutical company here has come in for much praise by MSF and other development agencies due to the cheap medical therapy it offers people with HIV.

The monthly cost for a cocktail of anti-AIDS drugs produced by the state agency amounts to 1,200 baht (30 U.S. dollars), as against 30,000 baht (750 dollars) per month that a dose of brand-name drugs from a pharmaceutical giant costs.

More than 20,000 of the estimated 200,000 people living with HIV in Thailand who need the anti-AIDS drug have access to them through state-run hospitals.

This South-east Asian country has close to 670,000 people with HIV out of a population of over 63 million people. Over 300,000 people have died due to AIDS since the pandemic was first detected here in the 1980s.

Thailand's ability to offer generic drug therapy to 10 percent of its population with HIV is much higher than the average across Asia - where some 43,000, or only four percent, of the one million people with HIV who need the strong cocktail of anti-AIDS drugs have access to them.

In order to protect this achievement, some Thai activists from across the social spectrum have mounted a campaign that seeks to scuttle the FTA with the United States and similar trade pacts Bangkok has in mind.

''We are against the FTA because it is detrimental to Thailand,'' Witoon Lianchumroon, coordinator of an umbrella group called FTA Watch, said in an interview. ''The government has not revealed all the details, including the consequences, to the public in Thai.'' (END/2004)

The Wichita Eagle | 05/21/2004 | Witness tells of body disposal

The Wichita Eagle | 05/21/2004 | Witness tells of body disposal

Witness Lauren Bertsch says Club Mexico owner Arturo Garcia admitted to killing three men when she helped him get rid of the bodies.

BY HURST LAVIANA

The Wichita Eagle


A former worker at the Club Mexico nightclub described in court Thursday how she helped move human body parts from a freezer into a pickup and then drove them to Cowley County to incinerate them.

"It reeked," Lauren Bertsch told a Sedgwick County District Court jury of the frozen plastic bags she moved. "It smelled like something I had never smelled before. The only way I could describe it is to say it smelled like death."

Bertsch, 19, was one of the first witnesses to take the stand in the triple-murder trial of Arturo "Jay" Garcia, who owned Club Mexico, 2600 S. Oliver.

Wichita police said it was in the basement of the club that Garcia shot and killed Clint Jones, 30, on July 26 during an all-night rave. Police said that five days later Garcia shot and killed two brothers -- Oscar Ramirez, 27, and Nicolas Ramirez, 22.

During her morning testimony, Bertsch described in detail how the club was used for drugs, prostitution and after-hours parties. During her afternoon testimony, she discussed her role in disposing of victims' bodies.

Bertsch was charged with aiding a felon in connection with the case, but was later granted diversion. In a diversion agreement, the charge is dropped if the defendant meets certain conditions set by the prosecutor.

Bertsch said she and a girlfriend first went to the club as customers in April, about three months after it opened. Three days after the visit, she said, she began working at the club.

Her job was to deliver drinks, talk to customers and help maintain a "cool environment." Bertsch said she made $50 to $200 a night in tips.

The club was normally open from 6 p.m. to 2 a.m., Bertsch said, and security guards with metal-detecting wands were at the doors on weekends. She said the majority of customers used cocaine or meth.

"Everyone tried to be inconspicuous, but I knew a lot of it was going on because I saw the coke and meth," she said.

It was also a place where you could buy drugs.

"If you knew the right people and they knew you were cool, you could find it," she said.

There were two types of after-hours parties at the club, Bertsch said. The first was for Garcia's friends and often included exotic dancers. The second type, all-night raves that lasted from 2:30 to 11 a.m., were open to everyone.

Bertsch said she got close to several people who worked at or visited the club. She said Garcia was among them.

"He was like a big brother to me," she said. "I loved him."

During a rave on the morning of July 27 -- about the time that Jones was killed -- Bertsch said she noticed that Garcia and some other club regulars were acting strangely.

"Everyone was acting a little tense," she said. "I wasn't allowed in the office. The kitchen was locked. Someone was blocking the entrance to the VIP room. The way people were carrying themselves seemed to be different."

On Aug. 6 -- a day she went to an orientation class for a new job at another restaurant -- Garcia asked whether he could use her family's land in Cowley County to burn some trash.

Bertsch said she suspected Garcia was trying to get rid of a body.

"It struck me as something secretive, something he needed to keep away from society," she said. "I thought I knew what he wanted to burn."

After agreeing to let Garcia use the land, Bertsch said, he drove her to his duplex in the 1500 block of North Market, and they went inside a detached garage.

The locked, top-loading freezer had a refrigerator door on top of it and a tire on top of that. Inside the freezer were objects that appeared to be wrapped in plastic bags.

"They were different sizes, different shapes," Bertsch said.

"Why did you stay?" asked District Attorney Nola Foulston.

"Because I told him I would help him," Bertsch replied.

The two loaded half of the packages into the truck, Bertsch said. She said she drank brandy during the 45-minute drive to Cowley County.

"Did you have any questions (like), 'Gee, why are we hauling this to my land?' " Foulston asked.

"I don't remember asking that question," Bertsch said. "He began to explain to me that it was three people in the back of the truck -- or parts of three people. And he explained why two of them had to be killed."

She said Garcia described how the Ramirez brothers, on the day they died, had come to the club to beat him up. She said Garcia said he shot them because they were threatening him with a broken beer bottle and because he had his son with him.

Once they got to the land, Bertsch said, the parts were loaded into two 50-gallon barrels, doused with gasoline and set afire. The remaining body parts were picked up later that day and disposed of in the same manner.

The trial resumes today in the courtroom of District Judge William Woolley.

Hydro engineer guilty of importing drugs

Montreal Gazette - canada.com network

A Hydro-Québec engineer from Montreal has been found guilty of importing large quantities of cocaine.

Fernand Imbeault, 66, defended himself at the trial where he heard the guilty verdict read by Judge Jean-Guy Boilard. The judge ordered Imbeault be incarcerated until his sentencing hearing. The Crown is seeking a prison sentence of 12 to 15 years.

Imbeault was found guilty of conspiring to import 200 kilograms of cocaine every 10 days from Mexico in the spring of 2002. A criminal lawyer, José Guede, is accused of aiding Imbeault. His trial will begin in December.

2 immigration plans flawed

2 immigration plans flawed

May. 21, 2004 12:00 AM


Now that the Democrats have an immigration bill to counter the president's proposed guest worker program, which program would best improve the immigration situation?

Neither will decrease the number of illegal border crossers or how many will die trying to enter the United States illegally.

The Democrats' bill will allow immigrants to become permanent legal residents if they prove they lived in the United States for five years and have been employed for two years. I guess the Democrats in Congress didn't know it's illegal to hire undocumented immigrants.

The Democrats' proposal should be called triple amnesty. First amnesty for entering the country illegally, second amnesty for working here illegally and third amnesty for the employers who illegally hired them.

The Bush proposal would give millions of illegal aliens temporary legal status, which is the same as amnesty.

Both proposals would benefit employers of undocumented immigrants. As long as laws against the hiring of undocumented aliens are not enforced, those laws will continue to be broken and people will continue to cross our border illegally or die trying. - Bob Haran
Phoenix





Linguistic lunacy


What a shame the Arizona Department of Education is threatening to ban a Spanish spelling bee.

It shows that Tom Horne and his staff are much more interested in stamping out Spanish than they are in teaching children to speak English.

All major corporations are concentrating their marketing efforts on a population with a growing number of people who speak Spanish. Anyone who graduates from an Arizona school literate in English and Spanish will have a definite edge over someone who is limited by being literate in English only.

Don't be deceived by English-only advocates who constantly state that California's test scores have gone up as a result of their doing away with bilingual education. California went to great efforts to lower class size, and it appears to have paid off.

Secondly, there are still plenty of bilingual programs in California. Its law isn't as tough as the law in Arizona. Thousands of parents signed waivers so their children could continue to receive bilingual education.

Last I heard, there were 29 lawsuits pending regarding the English-only proposition. It's only a matter of time before one succeeds.

- Sue Azizi


Chandler

The Washington Dispatch

The Washington Dispatch

Immigration Invasion View from a Border Patrol Officer
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Commentary by Frosty Wooldridge
May 21, 2004


After 30 years in the Border Patrol as a special agent and highly decorated veteran, John W. Slagle wrote an expose’ ripping the pants off Tom Ridge’s Homeland Security charade. Slagle exposes Congress’ complete assistance of illegal immigration. Finally, he uncovers President Bush’s unending support for this massive invasion that will, in the end, prove more catastrophic to this nation than dozens of 9/11’s.



Interviewing John W. Slagle at his home in the Arizona desert brings to mind what an interview with Harry S. Truman might have been like. The buck stops here! Slagle, a certified second degree black belt instructor in Japanese sword fighting, is not the kind of man that plays a casual game of chess. He’s a warrior. He’s defended America in the Navy and as a border patrol officer for most of his life.



After watching the accelerating illegal alien invasion for three decades, he wrote, Illegal Entries as an expose’ of America’s failed immigration policy. You won’t be disappointed as it reads like a James Bond novel. But I this case, Slagle illustrates how the United States loses its national sovereignty via the past five presidents and Congress. What defines this invasion? Power and money at the highest levels! It involves corporations and politicians representing illegal aliens more than American citizens. It exposes reasons for the downright violation of the rule of law by our own lawmakers.



America’s downfall, Slagle writes, began with the surreptitious passing by Teddy Kennedy and LBJ’s 1965 Immigration Reform Act. This little known document was not voted on or asked for by American citizens. It opened the floodgates to one million immigrants annually. Previously, only 178,000 annually were allowed. At first, they arrived without fanfare. But today, 60 million immigrants later and rising like a dangerous tidal wave; they crash upon our shores without pause. Where we were once a stable population, we are now the fastest growing country behind China and India.



Once the corporations realized huge profits from cheap labor immigrants, they busted unions and lowered wages. A few elites profited while the rest of us paid the bills. Soon, illegals trickled into America. Now, they ‘pour’ in at one million annually. The total of 2.3 million people yearly has become an endless human monsoon. “Due to the fact that illegals work for far less money that US citizens, greedy employers hired illegals for maximum profits,” Slagle said. “Taxes did not have to be paid, nor employee benefits.”



Legal immigrant costs alone to American taxpayers exceed $68 billion annually. But American citizens started paying benefits for illegals such as aid to dependent children, billions for schooling, medical services, free lunch programs, assisted housing and higher insurance rates. Along the way, illegals drove cars without insurance or licenses. With them came crime, diseases and prisons. Legal and illegal immigrants fill an astounding 29% of state and federal prisons at a taxpayer cost of $1 billion annually.



“Illegal immigration and the ruthless nature of alien smugglers who transport human cargo by vehicles is a serious concern,” Slagle said. “Smugglers will pack a pick-up three deep. Aliens, stacked like cordwood, are covered with tarps as smugglers proceed to staging areas.” Where do they obtain the vehicles? In 2003, Phoenix became the car-jacking capital of the world with 57,600 stolen SUV’s and pick-ups. And who among you thinks a head of lettuce or handpicked strawberry was cheap?



What does a ‘coyote’ make? “A smuggler easily makes $5,000.00 a week tax free,” Slagle said.



At first in the 70s, the flow included 8,000 arrests of illegals per month in one sector of Arizona with an estimated 16,000 'got aways’, but they were all cheap labors and prospective voters. How safe are Americans from this invasion? “The sale of false documents are available worldwide,” Slagle said. “A criminal can look like an ordinary citizen in the blink of an eye.”



In contrast, in 2004, Border Patrol apprehensions reached 96,521 in January which was up from 86,925 in January, 2003. More sobering is the fact that agents catch only one in five aliens.



“For a price, anyone can be smuggled into the USA by human traffickers whether cheap labor, wanted criminals or terrorist cells,” Slagle said.



In 1979, Daryl Gates, in Los Angeles, created the perfect cover for illegal aliens with his ‘Special Order 40’. It gave illegal aliens immunity from police arrest. Unfortunately, that ‘sanctuary order’ also provided cover for the 20,000 member 18th Street Gang in LA as well as the MS-13 Salvadoran gangs that now operate in 28 American cities. Worse, Governor Baldacci of Maine signed the first statewide sanctuary law into being this year.



What we’re seeing is our Congress and national leadership dismantling our laws by not enforcing them. Lawlessness becomes the norm, just like Third World corruption. Illegal aliens now have more rights and privileges than Americans. If you are an illegal alien, you can drive a car without a driver’s license or insurance. You may obtain medical care without paying. You may work without paying taxes. Your children enjoy free education at the expense of taxpaying Americans.



As Slagle chronicles in his book, Illegal Entries, the United States suffers a hemorrhaging of its sovereignty, rule of law, single language and cohesiveness as the onslaught of this immigration juggernaut sweeps like a deadly plague across this country.



Next: Part II—Incredible Money and Drugs Being Imported and Exported


EUROPE - OR GEORGIAFORNIA? MALDEF SPEAKS. By D.A. King posted May 21, 2004, 13:58

EUROPE - OR GEORGIAFORNIA? MALDEF SPEAKS. By D.A. King posted May 21, 2004, 13:58

Drugs Easily Obtained at Nogales Pharmacy

East Valley Tribune Online

Special Report: Muscle relaxant favored by E.V. teens easily obtained at Nogales pharmacies
By Kristina Davis, Tribune
NOGALES, Mexico - Here, just across the border, neon-colored signs in the windows of dozens of pharmacies scream "Soma for sale."
Salesmen in white lab coats battle for business on the sidewalks and will readily fill orders for several thousand of the muscle relaxant pills.

"About 60 percent of the people who buy Soma are the younger people," said Israel Sandoval, a manager at Con Vida pharmacy.

Pharmacy workers said they fill Soma orders several times a week for American teenagers, a trend that has been going on for years.

But the Soma pipeline from Mexico has been largely hush-hush in the East Valley until police broke up a couple of Soma drug rings recently at local high schools.

A 16-year-old Gilbert girl was arrested last month and later charged with two drug-related crimes, and seven other teens could face similar charges after Soma was found at five Mesa and Gilbert schools. Twenty-nine Gilbert students were suspended in March for buying, possessing or selling the drug on campus.

As the prescription drug trend has come to the forefront, Mexican officials say they are cracking down on pharmacies that sell the drug without authorized prescriptions, while U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration officials plan to propose placing the drug under federal control.

AN EASY BUY
Soma, or carisoprodol, is a muscle relaxant that requires a prescription in Arizona. In Mexico, it is sold under the name Somacid, a less expensive brand manufactured in Guadalajara.

Last month, the Mexican federal Secretariat of Health sent a letter to Nogales pharmacies warning that Soma was a controlled substance and was illegal to sell without a prescription from an American or Mexican doctor, pharmacy employees said.

But Dr. Jaime Leon, an official with the Secretariat of Health in Hermosillo, Mexico, could not confirm if Soma has been officially reclassified under the country’s General Health Law.

"Unfortunately, a revision would still make it hard to control," Leon said. "It would still be sold freely."

And that’s apparent. Most pharmacies continue to sell the drug with no questions asked.

A Tribune reporter easily purchased 100 Somacid pills for $30 without a prescription from Nogales Pharmacy earlier this month. But at other pharmacies, a prescription was necessary when the reporter identified herself as such. A prescription, however, can be easily purchased from pharmacies or local doctors.

"I can write a prescription for $20 extra," offered one salesman from Discount Pharmacy, the city’s largest pharmacy chain. "It will say your name and take once a day or once an hour, whatever you want."

BRINGING IT HOME
Soma is not only easy to purchase in Mexican pharmacies, but it is legal to bring across the border in small amounts without a prescription.

All prescription medications from Mexico require a prescription from an American doctor, said Joyce Jarvis, a supervisor with the U.S. Customs and Border Protection.

But the customs agency and DEA allow travelers to bring back up to 50 pills
per person of any FDA-approved medication from Mexico without a prescription, federal officials said. The DEA considers that to be a reasonable amount of pills for legitimate personal medical use.

The pills must be declared to customs officials, or officials can seize the drug and fine violators the domestic value of the medication.

"We are seeing in recent years the regulations being exploited by some people bringing the drugs into the U.S. for illicit use," said Ramona Sanchez, a spokeswoman for the DEA in Phoenix.

The concern has prompted DEA officials to look at making Soma a federally controlled substance, which would place enforcement duties with the DEA instead of local police. A federal jurisdiction would mean harsher sentences for Soma buyers, distributors and traffickers.

Sanchez said the DEA is beginning the process by gathering information on Soma for a report to be presented to the Department of Health and Human Services to reclassify the drug.

"When we see teens abusing a drug like this, you can bet it will slowly creep into our radar. We take it very seriously," Sanchez said. "Hopefully it will prompt Mexican authorities that the problem is filtering in through the U.S."

Soma (carisoprodol)

• Soma is a prescription muscle relaxant manufactured in the United States.

• Alcohol-like effects include wooziness, drowsiness and giddiness.

• Abuse of the drug can result in addiction, seizures, coma or death.

• Somacid is a Mexican brand manufactured in Guadalajara.

• In Mexico, Soma costs $30 to $35 and Somacid costs $18 to $30 for two 50-pill bottles.

• In the United States, street value is $1 to $5 per 350 mg pill.

National News: Immigration bill would make it easier to deport criminal aliens

National News: Immigration bill would make it easier to deport criminal aliens

May 21, 2004 (AXcess News/SHFW) Washington DC – An Indiana representative is sponsoring legislation that will make it more difficult for immigrants convicted of crimes to delay being deported.

"Immigrants have been allowed to stay here under a broken system," said Rep. John Hostettler, R, at a Capitol Hill news conference Wednesday. "It's not fair that they take advantage of this country's good will."

The Fairness in Immigration Litigation Act, which is also being introduced in the Senate, will deny criminal aliens the right to file habeas corpus petitions asking federal district courts to review their deportation orders. Such petitions usually prolong the immigrant’s stay in this country.

Sen. Orrin Hatch, R-Utah, the bill's chief Senate sponsor, said that, currently, aliens with criminal convictions can easily obtain review of their deportation orders by a federal district court. But illegal aliens who do not have criminal convictions have to go directly to the court of appeals after receiving an order of deportation. Under current statues, he said, criminals get more reviews and are able to delay their deportation.

"In 1995 there were 403 immigration habeas petitions filed," said Hatch, chairman of the Senate Judiciary Committee.
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"In 2003, that number rose to 2,374. Clearly a legislative fix is necessary to streamline the judicial review process."

Hostettler introduced a companion bill in the House.

The bill will also address three other areas of immigration law.

It will put the burden of proof in asylum cases on the applicant. There are many cases of asylum fraud because the U.S. government has the burden of disproving claims, Hatch said.

The act will also clarify existing statutes so the U.S. government can deport illegal aliens even if their home country doesn't want them back, Hatch said.

And, because immigration is a national concern, the act will consolidate immigration review in the Court of Appeals for the Federal Circuit in Washington.

Hatch made clear that the point of the bill is not to make new rules for deportation or take away any rights of aliens. It will just make the process more fair, he said.

"What we have done to this point isn't working," said the bill's co-sponsor, Sen. John Cornyn, R-Texas. "This bill is an important step in the right direction."

AXcess News will be reporting on any new market trends related to this story. Members should watch their in-box for late breaking news. If you're not a member, consider joining now. Members get the latest business news, commentaries and stock picks delivered right to their in-box.

WFAA.com-Egyptian Man Held for Bomb threat and immigration violations on Greyhound heded to Dallas

WFAA.com | News for Dallas-Fort Worth, Texas | Texas/Southwest

Man tells immigration officials he left bomb on bus
Nothing found on Dallas-bound shuttle; he's in custody


09:41 PM CDT on Friday, May 21, 2004


By ERNESTO LONDOя / Al D?



An undocumented Egyptian man taken off a Dallas-bound Greyhound bus Thursday night near El Paso told immigration authorities that he had left a bomb onboard.

The bus was stopped and searched, but no bomb was found and the man was being held Friday on immigration violations.

Border Patrol spokesman Bill Brooks said the 41-year-old man initially told agents at the Sierra Blanca checkpoint that he wasn't traveling with any luggage other than a backpack.

"During inspection, we found he had a baggage claim receipt," Mr. Brooks said. "We asked him what was in the bag. He said it was a bomb."

Roughly two hours after the arrest, a bomb squad stopped the bus on a deserted stretch of Interstate 10, about 120 miles east of Sierra Blanca. Passengers were asked to disembark and traffic was blocked off for several miles in both directions while officers searched the bus, officials said.

"There's no interest in this guy as a terrorism threat," said Special Agent Andrea Simmons, an FBI spokeswoman in El Paso. "It sounds as though there might be some mental stability concerns."

Officials declined to identify the man, who was being held Friday at the Hudspeth County Jail due to his immigration status.

George Campbell, assistant chief Border Patrol agent for the Marfa sector, said the man had been deported from the United States in 2002 and apparently re-entered the country through New York City sometime this year. He said the man told officers that he was headed to Dallas.

Agent Campbell said federal prosecutors in El Paso will probably charge the man with re-entering the country in violation of his deportation order.

Twenty-seven passengers arrived at the Greyhound station in downtown Dallas shortly after 3 p.m. Friday.

Some said they were surprised it took law enforcement officials two hours to stop the bus after the bomb threat was made.

"It was surreal, an awful experience," said passenger Michele Douglas, 34. "It was unbelievable. This kind of thing just doesn't happen on a Greyhound bus."

Passengers said they were asked to leave their belongings in the bus, disembark and form a single line. While officers searched the bus, passengers said they had to wait in the rain. They were then transported to the Reeves County Sheriff's Department on a jail bus, they said.

"When they told us to step away from the bus we knew it was a red alert," said passenger Charlie Briggs, 48. "We left everything on the bus. Everything was tossed out in the rain."

The passengers said they were told the inspection was connected to the immigration arrest but were not told about the bomb threat for several hours.

A spokeswoman for Greyhound Lines Inc. said passengers who were on that bus will be reimbursed for the cost of their fare if they request it.

"Events were largely out of our control," said Lynn Brown, vice president for corporate communications for Greyhound in Dallas. "In situations like these, we cooperate fully with authorities. Passenger safety is our top concern."

Ms. Douglas said the ordeal made her miss her bus connection to Savannah, Ga., and she would have to wait four hours to catch the next bus in that direction.

"A shower would be nice," she said.

E-mail elondono@aldiatx.com

It's truth we need, not guest workers

It's truth we need, not guest workers

So which is the truth?

The Republic's editorial stance on Wednesday ("Coyote cunning") states that smugglers of illegal aliens, known as coyotes, survive because "the simple fact that U.S. businesses want the labor that Mexicans and other Latin American people will risk their lives to provide."

Yet last week The Republic quoted Vince Wood, assistant director of the state Department of Economic Security's benefits and eligibility division, in an article about how Arizona's food stamp program more than doubled with a 108 percent jump, that people have been moving to Arizona hoping to find work, but there are not enough entry-level and low-skill jobs to meet the need.

So which one is the truth? They both are.

There aren't enough entry-level and low-skilled jobs because they are being filled with undocumented immigrants to the degree that they are displacing naturalized citizens. Without steady jobs on which to rely, these citizens turn to the state and federal government for assistance in the form of food stamps and other social services.

Congress doesn't need to get busy shaping a fair, humane guest-worker program from the proposals in front of them, as The Republic suggests. It needs to realize that we have adequate resources for entry-level and low-skilled workers, with more than 2,000 school-age children dropping out of class every day. It needs to understand that we don't need to import cheap labor so businesses can undercut trade wages. It needs to get busy getting its citizens back to work and off of assistance.

The truth hurts sometimes, but someone in Congress needs to step up and tell it. - Michael Ricci, Phoenix

It's truth we need, not guest workers

It's truth we need, not guest workers

It's truth we need, not guest workers
May. 22, 2004 12:00 AM


So which is the truth?

The Republic's editorial stance on Wednesday ("Coyote cunning") states that smugglers of illegal aliens, known as coyotes, survive because "the simple fact that U.S. businesses want the labor that Mexicans and other Latin American people will risk their lives to provide."

Yet last week The Republic quoted Vince Wood, assistant director of the state Department of Economic Security's benefits and eligibility division, in an article about how Arizona's food stamp program more than doubled with a 108 percent jump, that people have been moving to Arizona hoping to find work, but there are not enough entry-level and low-skill jobs to meet the need.

So which one is the truth? They both are.

There aren't enough entry-level and low-skilled jobs because they are being filled with undocumented immigrants to the degree that they are displacing naturalized citizens. Without steady jobs on which to rely, these citizens turn to the state and federal government for assistance in the form of food stamps and other social services.

Congress doesn't need to get busy shaping a fair, humane guest-worker program from the proposals in front of them, as The Republic suggests. It needs to realize that we have adequate resources for entry-level and low-skilled workers, with more than 2,000 school-age children dropping out of class every day. It needs to understand that we don't need to import cheap labor so businesses can undercut trade wages. It needs to get busy getting its citizens back to work and off of assistance.

The truth hurts sometimes, but someone in Congress needs to step up and tell it. - Michael Ricci, Phoenix

The New York Times > New York Region > Laborer's Death Prompts Homicide Investigation

The New York Times > New York Region > Laborer's Death Prompts Homicide Investigation

Laborer's Death Prompts Homicide Investigation
By MICHAEL BRICK and JESS WISLOSKI

Published: May 22, 2004


he job paid $90 a day with no benefits. It required heavy lifting while balancing on flimsy platforms three stories high, exposed to the elements but not to the knowledge that the work flouted safety rules and construction blueprints.

Angel Segovia, 37, took the job, and for him there were even more hardships. Besides having to rise at 4:30 a.m. for a two hour train ride or share a three-bedroom apartment with five cousins, Mr. Segovia also had to give up seeing his wife, two daughters and a son for four years, since moving to New York to find work to support them.

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And in the end, which came Thursday morning, the job cost him his life. His employer was Big Apple Development and Construction of Bayside, Queens.

Prosecutors in the Brooklyn district attorney's office opened a homicide investigation into the death of Mr. Segovia, an Ecuadorean immigrant who fell when an illegally constructed balcony roof snapped from the wall of a new luxury condominium building in Brooklyn, law enforcement officials said yesterday.

The city medical examiner's office said his death was caused by blows to his head and torso and injuries to internal organs. The death was ruled an accident, a medical designation that meant the collapse of the balcony was an unexpected event. The ruling did not assign or relieve civil or criminal liability, said Ellen Borakove, a spokeswoman for the medical examiner's office.

Advocates for laborers and immigrants used Mr. Segovia's death to call for criminal prosecutions of developers and construction companies that put workers at risk. They criticized the efforts of federal labor regulators as ineffective.

Robert M. Morgenthau, the Manhattan district attorney, whose office has no jurisdiction in Mr. Segovia's death, said in a telephone interview that the exploitation of undocumented laborers is increasingly drawing the attention of prosecutors in large cities.

"We're going out and trying to find these cases, because the workers are afraid to report them," Mr. Morgenthau said. "I do think it's a serious and growing problem, the exploitation of illegal workers."

The city's Buildings Department workers, who had sealed off the site of the accident at the intersection of Forth Hamilton Parkway and 97th Street in Bay Ridge, began dismantling the balconies yesterday. Some of the workers on the project returned to the building yesterday to pack up and head off to work on another project for Big Apple in New Jersey.

One of the two workers injured in the collapse, Jose Fernandez, 20, was released from Lutheran Medical Center in Sunset Park, said Neal Gorman, a hospital spokesman. A second injured worker, who was admitted to Lutheran under the name Bac Gumyul, 40, was in critical condition, Mr. Gorman said.

Mr. Segovia and the injured workers were pouring concrete onto a balcony roof that was held up by cantilevered support beams when one of the beams gave way, sending the workers tumbling three stories in a deluge of bricks and flowing wet cement.

The cantilevering contradicted plans on file with the Buildings Department, which issued violations on Thursday against three companies involved in the project - Marine Partners, the owner, of Yonkers; Big Apple Development and Construction, the main contractor; and Pro Weld Fabricators, the contractor on the balcony work, of South Ozone Park, Queens. Officials of those companies did not return repeated calls seeking comment yesterday.

Brian M. McLaughlin, a state Assemblyman and the president of the New York City Central Labor Council, an advocacy group chartered by the A.F.L.-C.I.O., said Mr. Segovia's death underscored the need for criminal prosecutions to ensure safe working conditions for immigrant laborers.

"You have people who come here seeking a better way of life," Mr. McLaughlin said. "They're willing to take a job whether it's dangerous or not."

Across the country, prosecutors in California have been more aggressive than others in pursuing convictions in connection with workplace deaths, but New York prosecutors have had some successes.

In January, Philip V. Minucci, a contractor, was sentenced to 3 to 10 years in prison after pleading guilty to manslaughter charges in the deaths of five construction workers who were killed when a scaffold collapsed at a building in Gramercy Park in October 2001. Mr. Minucci admitted that he had designed the scaffold without regard for its safety.

Mr. Segovia, who had worked as a farmer and construction worker in Ecuador, had viewed the job, dangerous as it was, as a way to build a home for his wife, Emma, and their children, according to relatives in Queens interviewed yesterday who asked that their names be withheld because they fear deportation.

Mr. Segovia had moved to the United States four years ago, and three of his brothers had followed, spreading out to find work in Brooklyn, Connecticut and Pennsylvania. Other family members were closer. Mr. Segovia lived in a three-bedroom apartment on the second floor of a vinyl-sided, two-story home with a view of a car dealership in Jamaica, Queens. So did five of his cousins.

He found work with Big Apple a year after arriving in the United States, and worked for the company steadily for the next three years, his family said. Two years ago, Mr. Segovia broke a hand on the job and was out of work for a few months.

He had not traveled home in those four years because of his immigration status, and his wife and children have never been to the United States for the same reason. His paychecks came twice a month, amounting to a little more than $400 a week, and he sent about $200 a week to his wife, family members said.

"He was building a house in Ecuador," Mr. Segovia's cousin said. "He didn't finish."


Ann Farmer and David Chen contributed reporting for this article

deseretnews.com | Migration to U.S. a hellish journey

deseretnews.com | Migration to U.S. a hellish journey

Migration to U.S. a hellish journey

Locked big rig is airless, sweltering
By Pauline Arrillaga
Associated Press

Editor's note: A deadly tractor-trailer run from El Paso, Texas, to Dallas reveals the desperation and greed fueling the booming business of smuggling human beings. This is Part 1 of a three-part serial narrative.


An undocumented Mexican immigrant lies on boxes in the back of an 18-wheel truck near Dallas in July 2002. He and other illegal immigrants were locked in the truck as they were smuggled into the United States.

Associated Press
CHAPARRAL, N.M. — The 18-wheeler pulled off the desert highway and rumbled down a pockmarked clay road, its headlights raking a desolate hamlet of doublewides.
The big rig, making an unscheduled detour at the start of a midnight run from El Paso to Dallas, slowed as it approached a dingy mobile home. Then the headlights snapped off.
Moving as stealthily as a tractor-trailer can, it turned through a gap in a chain-link fence, backed up and stopped at the mobile home's back door.
Jason Sprague climbed down from the cab into the balmy night air and swung open the trailer's heavy cargo doors. Then he headed inside for his money.
That's when he saw them. Under a faint ceiling lamp, dozens of ragged people waited silently in two lines stretching between the kitchen and the living room, men on one side, women and little ones on the other. Some clasped small bags; others had only the clothes on their backs.
Avoiding their glances, Sprague hurried past and stepped into the bathroom where a woman was waiting. She handed him a bulging envelope. Inside was $3,000 in cash.
"You'll get the rest when it's completed," she told him.
Sprague walked back to the cab and settled into the driver's seat as the woman and her partner loaded the human cargo.
He had been told there would be 32 of them — illegal immigrants who had made it across the Rio Grande to this drop house 20 miles outside El Paso. Now they had to be smuggled past an internal Border Patrol checkpoint and dropped off at a truck stop in Dallas.
As they clambered into the freight compartment, Sprague felt the rig rock. He wasn't counting, but the rocking went on and on. How many people were they stuffing back there?







"Uno por uno," the loaders hissed. One by one. Walk fast.
In the line, inching forward, Luciano Alcocer smiled to himself, grateful to be moving.
Eight days earlier, the carpenter from Mexico City had kissed his wife and daughters goodbye. Don't cry, he told his children as their eyes filled; this could be our salvation.
The companies that once bought the tables and desks Alcocer built had shut down. But there was work to be had in the United States. A relative already in the States made the arrangements, sending about $1,500 to the smugglers. He gave Alcocer a number to call once he reached the Mexican border town of Ciudad Juarez.
Alcocer followed the instructions. He met a guide who led him through chest-high water across the Rio Grande. In El Paso, a car picked him up.
For days, he'd hidden inside the crowded mobile home, where two members of the smuggling ring gouged migrants $5 for three packages of ramen noodles, $10 for a six-pack of beer.
Now, half-past midnight on July 27, 2002, the slight, 5-foot-3, 41-year-old, carrying only his hopes and a couple of T-shirts, climbed a stepladder propped against the truck's open freight compartment.
Two of the others, Pioquinto Cabrera and Guillermo Gallo, grabbed his arms and hauled him inside. It was dark in there, and cramped.
The 53-foot-long aluminum-walled trailer, lined with plywood, was packed almost to the roof with cardboard boxes of medical supplies manufactured in Mexico and bound for Wisconsin.
Alcocer crawled three-quarters of the way in, settling atop a box on the driver's side. Stretching his legs out in front of him, he reached up and touched the ceiling.

A police evidence photo shows dents in the side of a truck where illegal immigrants tried to gouge air holes with a barber's scissors.

Associated Press
Others silently climbed inside — about 40 people in all. Another seven or so, all women and children, piled into the sleeping compartment behind the cab.
Inside the trailer, Alcocer watched the shadowy outlines of the passengers filing in.
There was Jose Gaston Ramirez, a 59-year-old shoemaker from Cuernavaca, looking very American in a red Calvin Klein T-shirt. He was bound for Chicago to reunite with his daughter.
Edson Rojas, a tall, skinny 16-year-old from Mexico City eager to join his father in Kansas, climbed up and claimed a spot. Like several others, he'd paid extra to ride in the sleeping compartment but was herded into the back anyway.
A few complained. The smugglers told them to go back to Mexico if they didn't like it.
Cabrera and Gallo were the last to scramble onto the boxes. The 28-year-old Cabrera was traveling from Veracruz to Kentucky to work the cattle farms. Gallo, 32, was on his way from Mexico City to New York for a restaurant job.
"Silencio!" the loaders ordered. Especially at the Border Patrol checkpoint, everyone must be silent.
With that, the heavy doors closed and everything went black.
Alcocer thought he heard a lock click. It was as if the doors were closing on an old life of despair. Later, he would invoke a different metaphor: Las puertas a la muerte.
The doors to death.
The engine roared to life and the truck began to roll.
It was the beginning of an American journey that thousands of illegal immigrants make. But this one would end almost a year and a half later — in a federal courtroom.
It was nearly 4 a.m. when Sprague picked up his co-driver, Troy Dock, in El Paso. Dock had made smuggling runs before, but this was Sprague's first, and he was jittery. With Dallas still at least 10 hours away, he wondered if they should call the whole thing off.
But there was money to be made — another $1,200 after the migrants were dropped at the truck stop.
Dock drove on; Sprague dozed.
Dock, 30, was short and stocky with the face of a choirboy. Sprague, 27, was built like the high school quarterback he once was, with a goatee and a tattoo of his name on his arm.
"Tweedledee and tweedledum," an acquaintance called them — a couple of bumbling good ol' boys. They'd just been hired as a driving team for Boyd Logistics Inc. of El Paso when Dock's contact in Ciudad Juarez, Pat Valdes, called to say he had a load that was ready to move.
Now, as they rolled down Interstate 10, Dock's cell phone kept ringing. It was Pat Valdes, Dock's contact in Ciudad Juarez, checking their progress, asking if they'd made it through the checkpoint yet.
Dock promised to touch base when they were safely through.
Ninety minutes east of El Paso, they drew near the Border Patrol checkpoint at Sierra Blanca, one of a network intended to intercept illegal immigrants and drugs moving north from the border.
In the blackness of the freight compartment, the illegals passed the time talking in hushed voices. Alcocer listened politely as an Argentine barber boasted of plans to ply his trade in Los Angeles.
"Tengo sed," someone said. I'm thirsty. One of the men used the illuminated dial of his watch to locate a water jug.
Sometime before sunrise, Alcocer felt the truck slow. The checkpoint, he figured. Everyone fell silent.
But a thought was nagging him: The smugglers had promised the trailer would be air-conditioned, but it was stuffy. Was any air getting in?
Outside, bright lights bathed the highway. Dock pulled the rig behind a line of trucks moving slowly past the checkpoint.
The checkpoint routine was like Russian roulette. Some trucks were stopped and searched, others waved through. Dock was pushing his luck; twice before he'd made it through with loads of illegals.
His stomach knotted. But even before he came to a complete stop, the agent waved him on by.
Dock let out a breath; Sprague dozed on.
A half-hour down the road, Dock pulled into a truck stop to get a drink. Using hand signals because he spoke little Spanish, he asked those in the sleeping compartment if they wanted anything. They declined. He didn't open the trailer to ask the others because he was afraid someone might see them. Besides, Valdes' orders were to keep the doors shut.
The sun was coming up as Dock swung back on the interstate. It was still 7 1/2 hours to Dallas.
Inside the freight compartment, Alcocer licked a finger and held it up to see if he could feel any air moving. Nothing.
Slivers of morning light squeezed through the seals of the trailer doors. The tempera- ture outside was rising, headed toward 95 degrees.
Rojas, the 16-year-old, stripped off his shirt. Alcocer did the same.
He grew very thirsty, but there was no water left in the jugs. They were urinals now.
"No hay aire," a woman said softly. There's no air.
The word spread quickly. No hay aire, other travelers murmured. No hay aire!
Suddenly a young man vomited.
Some of the migrants began moving toward the doors, praying that a little oxygen was leaking through.
Alcocer heard ripping. Others were pulling flaps from the packing boxes and using them to fan themselves. Alcocer snatched off a piece and waved it furiously.
The effort exhausted him.
Digging through the boxes, someone pulled out some plastic tubes and passed them forward. Those at the rear tugged away the gummy seals around the trailer doors in search of an airway, then forced one end of a tube through the crevice and tried to breathe through the other.
Nothing.
Gallo, the strapping man who had helped Alcocer aboard, began tearing at the plywood on the trailer walls, slicing his fingers. Alcocer tried to help, pounding the wood with his elbows. They managed to break off a few pieces, only to expose the trailer's aluminum walls.
How do we make a hole? someone said.
The barber, Alcocer thought. He must have scissors!
"No, my friend," the barber said. His kit was too expensive.
Suddenly, all eyes were on him in the dim light.
"Give them to me," Alcocer demanded, his voice harsh.
Gallo grabbed the scissors. He stabbed the aluminum walls again and again, gouging a couple of small holes before the scissors bent uselessly.
They tried everything. Nothing worked.
The temperature inside the freight compartment kept climbing. Later, police would estimate it reached 150 degrees.
"I'm thirsty," Alcocer cried out.
Someone passed him a jug. He knew what was in it, but what choice did he have? He drank.
Up in the cab, the roar of the engine drowned out the noise from the cargo hold. Sprague and Dock drove on, oblivious. Cruising through the blazing prairie outside Odessa, they popped a Garth Brooks recording into the tape player and switched on the cab's air conditioner.
Back in the trailer, their passengers were swinging their arms wildly — pounding the walls, the doors, the ceiling. The sound was booming, but in Alcocer's oxygen-deprived state, it seemed oddly muffled.
They shouted: Open up! Open up!
Hyperventilating, a teenage girl crawled toward the doors and screamed, "Call 911! Call anybody!"
In the gloom, Alcocer watched Jose Gaston Ramirez lie down on the boxes. Back in the mobile home, he had snored when he slept, but he wasn't making a sound now.
Pioquinto Cabrera crawled by, clutching a jug of urine. Alcocer asked for another drink. No, Cabrera said. It's for one of the ladies.
Another traveler peeled off his shirt, put it in his mouth and tried to suck out the sweat.
Soon, the hallucinations started. A helicopter is flying overhead! someone shouted. The police are following! cried another. I have a gun; I'm going to shoot out the tires! another yelled. But none of it was so.
No quiero morir, someone whimpered. I don't want to die.
Alcocer whispered a prayer. "I'm in your hands, God. Take care of my family."
Then his head lolled back, and he closed his eyes.

To be continued...



--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Editor's note — The scenes inside the truck cab are based on jailhouse interviews with Troy Dock and Jason Sprague, on transcripts and videos of their police interrogations, and on court testimony of migrants who rode in the sleeping compartment. The description of the loading is from interviews with Sprague and migrant Luciano Alcocer, and on the testimony of other migrants. The movements of the truck come from the drivers and from the vehicle's Global Positioning System, obtained from court records. The scenes inside the trailer are from interviews with migrants including Alcocer and Guillermo Gallo, and from the testimony of 10 other migrants. The migrants' backgrounds come from interviews with them and investigators, and from medical records, death certificates and court testimony. The direct quotes appear as they are remembered by those who spoke or heard them.